Adhesives, Sealants & Coatings

November 2020

Wood Adhesion: Isocyanate and Polyurethane Adhesives
Date: 06 November 2020 (Friday)
Time: 10.00 am (ET) (US Time) , ~ 90 Min.
Speaker: Dr. Joseph Marcinko
Language: English
Registration Fee: Members: 150 US$
Non-Members: 250 US$
Group: 1500 US$
To Register: Registration Form
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Description: Wood and other lignocellulosic composites are growing in use and the adhesives used in these composites plays a major part in how these composites perform in terms of mechanical and wet exposure properties. The largest wood composites markets are for panel products like Oriented Strand Board (OSB), Plywood, Particleboard (PB) and Medium and High-Density fiberboards (MDF and HDF). Another growing area that requires high performance adhesives is Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) which is a large-scale, prefabricated, solid engineered wood panel used in building construction. This webinar will discuss the complex nature of wood adhesion and explore the use of isocyanate and polyurethane adhesives as high performance adhesives for wood composites. The mechanism of how isocyanate and polyurethane adhesives work will be discussed along with important factors to consider when using these adhesives to make wood and lignocellulosic composites. The presentation topics include: An introduction to adhesive considerations, The unique nature of wood as a bonding surface, The chemistry of isocyanates and polyurethanes, Mechanism of isocyanate and polyurethane adhesion, Summary of important concepts, Questions and discussionss
Speaker: Dr. Joseph Marcinko, Principal Scientist and President of Polymer Synergies LLC Dr. Marcinko has over 30 years of industrial R&D, research management, and academic experience. His interests and expertise are in the areas of polyurethane chemistry, bio-polymers, adhesion science, wood composites, polymer characterization, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and polymer structure-property relationships. He is an adjunct professor and a developer of industrial short courses related to polyurethane and polymer chemistry and industrial problem solving. Dr. Marcinko has authored over 50 publications, and has 9 patents and 7 patents pending.

December 2020

Sustainable Macromolecular Materials and Manufacturing
Date: 09 December 2020 (Wednesday)
Time: 10.00 am (ET) (US Time) , ~60 Min
Speaker: Dr. Timothy Long
Language: English
Registration Fee: Members: 249 US$
Non-Member: 249 US$
To Register: Registration Form
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Description: This webinar will provide a platform for navigating the complexities of sustainable materials discovery ranging from advances in green chemistry to manufacturing processes that reduce waste and consume less energy. The content will be introductory in terms of defining key terms and leaders in the field, then advancing to specific research directions, life cycle analysis, and material flow analysis. Concepts related to bio-based materials, biomimicry, design for recyclability, chemical recycling, mechanical recycling, and opportunities for inovation across the continuum of innovation. The webinar will also focus on additive manufacturing platforms to demonstrate geometric complexity which reduces part weight but improves performance. Both instructors were previously employed in the chemical industry and hence will bring a vision for sustainability with a lens of potential commercial success. The content includes : # Introduction to the terminology of sustainability, green chemistry, and circular economy. # Discussion of life cycle analysis, energy consumption, and carbon capture; # Recent advances in sustainable materials discovery and engineering; # Future opportunities for research and innovation in sustainability
Speaker: Tim received his Ph.D. in Chemistry from Virginia Tech under the direction of Prof. James McGrath, and he subsequently joined both Eastman Kodak and Eastman Chemical companies for eight years upon graduation. He joined the faculty in the Department of Chemistry at Virginia Tech in 1999,where he also served as the Director of the Macromolecules Innovation Institute. Prof. Long joined the faculty of the School of Molecular Sciences at Arizona State University (ASU) in summer 2020 where he will launch and lead the Biodesign Center for Sustainable Macromolecular Materials and Manufacturing (BCSM3). In addition to over 400 peer-reviewed publications, his research awards include the 2020 Virginia Outstanding Faculty Award, 2015 Virginia Scientist of the Year, 2010 Virginia Tech Alumni Research Award, ACS PMSE Collaborative Research Award, Dalquist Award from the Adhesion Society, 2019 ACS Rubber Division Thermoplastic Elastomer Award, and the ACS POLY Mark Scholar Award. He has served as the Chair of the ACS Division of Polymer Chemistry, Chair of the Gordon Research Conference in Polymers, 2012 Chair of the IUPAC World Polymer Congress, and he currently serves as the Past-President of the Adhesion Society. He is a member of advisory boards for leading journals, and he was recently appointed as Editor-in-Chief of Wiley Polymer International. His research interests span structure-property-processing relationships for polymers with a focus on multiphase systems including ion-containing and hydrogen bonding containing block copolymers, biomaterials and hydrogels, sustainable polymers and processes, renewable feed stocks, and green chemistry. New monomer syntheses and polymerization processes have led to novel families of thermoplastic elastomers including controlled radical polymerization, living anionic polymerization, and the formation of segmented step-growth polymerization processes with a focus on polyurethanes and polyesters. His most recent research efforts address the need for tailored advanced macromolecules for advanced manufacturing (3D printing), including vat photopolymerization, direct-ink-write printing, selective laser sintering, powder bed fusion, and extrusion. This research has led to new families of engineering polymers, photo-reactive polymers, tissue scaffolds, and enzyme delivery systems. He has published in the area of drug/gene delivery and most recently focused on hydrogels for brachytherapy in oncology. This interdisciplinary research program has garnered approximately $50M in research funding from federal (NSF, NIH, DOE, PRF, and DOD) agencies and diverse international corporate sponsors.

Applications of FTIR in Polymer Process Development
Date: 10 December 2020 (Thursday)
Time: 10.00 am (ET) (US Time) , ~60 Min
Speaker: Dr. Anthony Parker
Language: English
Registration Fee: Members: 150 US$
Non-Members: 250 US$
Group: 1500 US$
To Register: Registration Form
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Description: FTIR spectroscopy is a powerful technique for studying the effects of polymer formulation and process factors on surface chemistry, component compatibility, and morphology; all of which relate to end-use performance characteristics like adhesion and mechanical properties. Of the many techniques available, surface attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy (SATR-FTIR) is arguably one of the most versatile FTIR methods, enabling the study of neat liquids, solutions, dispersions, solid films, solid powders, adhesives, adherends, and countless other multi-component systems. Aside from being fast, SATR can be applied in problem-solving situations pertaining to cure reactions (liquid and dispersion states), surface compositions & adhesion, process history & surface heterogeneity (e.g., extruded films), material structure, and product/process control. This seminar, although focused on SATR, will be the first in a series pertaining to applications of spectroscopic methods in product and process development. Those attending can expect to learn how SATR-FTIR can be applied to their own real-world product development & problem-solving situations. The webinar presentation includes: • Overview of FTIR spectroscopy & methods; • Description of the SATR technique; • Example Applications - Adhesion, Surface migration, Extruded film heterogeneity, Polymerization reactions, Material structure & composition
Speaker: Anthony Parker, Ph.D. is a Principal Scientist and founder of A. A. Parker Consulting, LLC. Dr. Parker has 35 years of industrial experience in research, development, and management. He has been involved in multiple start-up businesses ranging from medical devices and musical instrument strings to packaging adhesives, pharmaceutical delivery systems, and cosmetics. His interests and expertise are in the areas of surface chemistry and adhesion, bio-based materials and adhesives, mechanical properties of polymers, structure-property-process relationships in polymers, thermal analytical methods, spectroscopic methods (NMR, FTIR), UV curable coatings, and musical strings/ instruments. Dr. Parker has authored or co-authored more than 70 publications, including 30+ journal articles and technical reviews as well as 40+ patents with several patents pending.

February 2021

Organosilanes & Adhesion : Principles
Date: 11 February 2021 (Thursday)
Time: 10.00 am (ET) (US Time) , ~60 Min
Speaker: Dr. Anthony Parker
Language: English
Registration Fee: Members: 150 US$
Non-Members: 250 US$
Group: 1500 US$
To Register: Registration Form
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Description: Organosilanes can be used to modify the surface chemistry of inorganic substrates for the purpose of controlling wetting and adhesion characteristics. Pendent functional groups can be selected to maximize the potential for wetting or for covalent bonding; or to achieve surface chelation with metals. For example, tri-alkoxysilanes can be used to modify the hydrophobicity and lipophilicity of inorganic oxide pigments for use in cosmetics applications, or to modify the dispersion characteristics of oxide powders for use in ceramics processing. Surface treatments can also be used to improve the adhesion and dispersion characteristics of inorganic particulates within solid polymeric coatings and composites. Moreover, because of their ability to self-polymerize, organosilanes can also be used to form interpenetrating networks with polymers to improve macroscopic adhesion and bonding characteristics; or to form stand-alone coatings to provide corrosion protection to metals. During processing, silanes can be delivered directly to inorganic surfaces in neat form, or via solution vehicles. Silanes can also be added directly to liquid dispersions, or even to solid polymer formulations. However, regardless of the processing approach, the key to success with these materials is knowing how and when to control hydrolysis reactions within the context of any given manufacturing process. This seminar is the first in a series aimed at exploring silane chemistry, characterization, formulating, and processing with an emphasis on hydrolysis control. Each seminar will focus on mechanistic and practical considerations pertaining to real-world applications. Those who attend can expect to learn about how and when to control the key factors that affect silane efficacy.The webinar presentation includes: • Review of wetting and adhesion concepts; • Overview of organosilanes – general structures and applications; • Hydrolysis & polymerization chemistry: mechanisms and key factors; • Interactions with surfaces & polymers
Speaker: Anthony Parker, Ph.D. is a Principal Scientist and founder of A. A. Parker Consulting, LLC. Dr. Parker has 35 years of industrial experience in research, development, and management. He has been involved in multiple start-up businesses ranging from medical devices and musical instrument strings to packaging adhesives, pharmaceutical delivery systems, and cosmetics. His interests and expertise are in the areas of surface chemistry and adhesion, bio-based materials and adhesives, mechanical properties of polymers, structure-property-process relationships in polymers, thermal analytical methods, spectroscopic methods (NMR, FTIR), UV curable coatings, and musical strings/ instruments. Dr. Parker has authored or co-authored more than 70 publications, including 30+ journal articles and technical reviews as well as 40+ patents with several patents pending.